Throwback Thursday: 1946

Of course, 1946 was the first full calendar year after the end of World War II. It was also 75 years ago for those of you who are mathematically challenged.

On January 10, 1946, the scientists of Project Diana bounced radar signals off the Moon. The exact distance between the Earth and the Moon was measured and, in essence, the project marked the beginning of the Space Age.

On March 5, 1946, in a speech at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, Winston Churchill used the phrase “Iron Curtain.” Here is the part of the speech where Churchill used the phrase, with some accompanying words for context:

 

“It is my duty however, for I am sure you would wish me to state the facts as I see them to you, to place before you certain facts about the present position in Europe.

From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent. Behind that line lie all the capitals of the ancient states of Central and Eastern Europe. Warsaw, Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade, Bucharest and Sofia, all these famous cities and the populations around them lie in what I must call the Soviet sphere, and all are subject in one form or another, not only to Soviet influence but to a very high and, in many cases, increasing measure of control from Moscow.”

 

On October 16, 1946, the last remaining ten Nazi war criminals sentenced to death at the Nuremberg trials were executed by hanging. Never Forget! Never Again!

******************

While US auto production actually resumed in calendar year 1945 after the end of the war, only about 83,000 cars were built. While the auto industry struggled with labor unrest and supply shortages, automobile production soared in 1946 as a population that had suffered for more than 15 years with an economic depression and world war was eager to buy any new car it could. I have been unable to find figures for calendar year 1946 production, but for the 1946 model year, production reached about 2.25 million units. That figure was still well below the 1941 number of about 3.7 million cars, however, perhaps testimony to the effects of the labor and supply difficulties.

General Motors, in particular, was hit hard by a strike that lasted 113 days from November, 1945 to March, 1946. The strike helped Ford lead in model year production at approximately 468,000 cars. Chevrolet built 398,000, but Plymouth and Dodge were third and fourth, respectively.

Ford’s most popular 1946 car was the Super DeLuxe Tudor sedan. I hope this picture (from Classic.com) is one of those:

 

See the source image

 

Yes, a “Tudor” sedan. While today we classify almost all four-door cars as sedans and almost all two-door cars as coupes, I think the original definition of those terms had to do with total interior space and not with the number of doors.

Of course, 1946 model year cars looked like prewar cars. Studebaker introduced an all-new car in late spring 1946, and new company Kaiser-Fraser began production about the same time, but these were, technically, 1947 model year cars. Is this a 1942 Chevrolet or a 1946? (Picture from Pinterest…)

 

See the source image

 

This is actually a 1942 Master DeLuxe town sedan, Chevy’s most popular car in the truncated 1942 model year. For 1946, its most popular offering was the Stylemaster sport sedan, which accounted for 19 percent of Chevrolet sales. Stylemaster was simply the new name for the Master DeLuxe line, which was the entry-level Chevrolet.

Of course, this post could not capture the entirety of world and automobile events for 1946. I encourage you to do some research on your own.

 

#ThrowbackThursday

#1946

#WinstonChurchill

#NeverForget!NeverAgain!

#1946FordSuperDeLuxeTudorSedan

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

If you like this blog please tell your friends and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.

 

 

The End Of The Beginning

In my OCD/numbers nerd world, I divide events into thirds. The first third is the beginning, the second third is the middle and the last third is, not surprisingly, the end.

Since today is the last day of April, to me today is the end of the beginning of 2021. Of course, Winston Churchill used “the end of the beginning” in what is now a famous remark in which he noted the Allied victory in the Battle of Egypt in November, 1942. Churchill’s celebrated comment was, “Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.”

Time passes ever more quickly, its rush disorienting.

******************

My condolences to the families of those killed in a stampede celebrating the Jewish holiday of Lag B’Omer at Mount Meron, Israel. At least 45 were killed and more than 150 were injured. Apparently, the incident was centered on a slippery walkway, with a metal floor, that was overcrowded. Large numbers of participants in a concert had been moving through the walkway, which was on an incline, many of them “slipped,” falling on those below them, causing a crushing domino effect.

I think, unfortunately, that’s life. Israel is the first country in the world to basically defeat the damn virus and get back to normal, but the exuberance of the moment probably contributed to the disaster. Nevertheless, I grow ever more disgusted by those who think everyone gets what they deserve, that life is part of some divine plan.

******************

Former Vice President, US Senator and member of the House of Representatives Alben Barkley made quite an exit on this day in 1956. After two years out of politics (he had been Truman’s Vice President from 1949 to 1953), Barkley returned at the age of 77 as the “junior” US Senator from Kentucky.

On April 30, 1956, he was addressing more than 1,000 students at Virginia’s Washington and Lee University’s Mock Convention. About 20 minutes into his talk he said, “I’m glad to be a junior [senator]. I’m glad to sit on the back row; for I would rather be a servant in the House of the Lord than to sit in the seats of the mighty.”

At that point, though, Barkley had a heart attack and tumbled into a microphone stand, collapsing in front of his shocked audience. To add to the drama, Mrs. Barkley was in the audience and watched helplessly as her husband died.

I wonder what Barkley would have thought about today’s very sad state of politics in the US. Republican member of the House of Representatives Liz Cheney is getting grief from her party about giving a fist bump to the President. Her reply is worth sharing:

 

“I disagree strongly w/@JoeBiden policies, but when the President reaches out to greet me in the chamber of the US House of Representatives, I will always respond in a civil, respectful & dignified way. We’re different political parties. We’re not sworn enemies. We’re Americans.”

 

The arrogance of ideologues makes me angrier by the day. NO ONE has a monopoly on truth, wisdom or good judgment and neither does ANY ideology. The blind adherence to ideology and the lack of acceptance of the truth that none of us knows everything about anything will be the ruination of this republic. In that case, maybe the US will get what it deserves.

******************

It was about five years ago, during the period when I was writing a blog hosted by the Evil Empire, that I posted the picture below after a couple of days of personal angst and realized that I wanted to write about cars.

 

 

I have looked at this photo dozens of times since then and it still fills me with joy. Without trying to be too dramatic, this photo changed my life. It calmed me down during a rough patch and gave me a purpose: to write about cars.

Once again, I am not trying to be dramatic or to garner sympathy when I write that this blog will not last forever. All things must come to an end.

At some point when my situation changes and/or when WordPress leaves its bloggers with no choice but to use the awful Block Editor, I will stop creating Disaffected Musings. It will not be a decision made lightly as this blog has become very important to me. However, when it becomes a chore and not an inspiration, I will have no choice but to stop.

I am grateful to those of you who read this blog. I don’t think I write that enough.

 

#TheEndOfTheBeginning

#WinstonChurchill

#LagBOmerTragedy

#AlbenBarkley

#LizCheney

#1948CadillacSeries62Convertible

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

If you like this blog please tell your friends and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.

 

Where Are We Wednesday

If we’re Elon Musk, we’re probably in Texas. In this post I relayed the CNBC story that Elon Musk had told friends and associates he would be moving to Texas. Yesterday, this CNBC story reported that he has, indeed, moved to the Lone Star State. Everyone repeat after me: People Vote With Their Feet.

Musk might literally save billions in taxes by making the move. Why on earth would he stay in the People’s Republic of Calizuela?

“Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy; its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.”

– Winston Churchill

******************

I am surprised that I have not had more “Where Am I?” moments after the move. I am also surprised that I seem to be sleeping better. Of course, before the move our lives were quite stressful and now that the move has occurred, that source of stress is removed. Views like this don’t hurt, either. (Sorry about all the blacktop. Hey, photobyjohnbo, maybe you can give me some lessons in photo editing.)

 

******************

My wonderful wife and I have really enjoyed watching the first season of Transplant on NBC. The show is about a Syrian refugee who is a doctor and who has relocated with his younger sister to Toronto (Tronto as the natives pronounce it). Transplant is a Canadian production that NBC is showing to fill the void caused by the damn virus. The final two episodes of the first season aired yesterday.

The show has been renewed for a second season in Canada. We really hope NBC will continue to air Transplant even after US TV production returns to “normal.”

Those who know me and my obsession with House might want to know how I would compare the two shows. In a nutshell (I hear you, nut case is more appropriate), House was more cerebral and Transplant is more emotional. House was better written, but Transplant seems more realistic although the premise of House about a medical genius explains that distinction, at least in part.

From babytorrent.se a picture of the main cast of Transplant:

 

See the source image

******************

Long live UTZ potato chips!

 

 

The UTZ brand is not available in the supermarkets here. I tried the “generic” brand of potato chip offered by the store where I do most of our grocery shopping. (Yes, I always wear a mask and sometimes I wear a mask AND a face shield.) All I tasted was salt. I went online and ordered the “Vending Services Bags” from UTZ.

In 2001, Consumer Reports conducted a nationwide taste test of potato chips. UTZ won.

I used to have a semi-regular dialogue with Jim Schwartz, long-time NFL coach and a Baltimore native like me. Somehow, one of our conversations moved to Tastykake (a bakery brand familiar to those in the mid-Atlantic) and then Schwartz said, “To hell with Tastykake. What I can’t get here in Tennessee (he was on the Titans’ staff at the time) is UTZ.” When I told him he could order the chips online he sounded quite happy and I think he ordered a dozen big bags of chips.

I am quite happy that I can eat UTZ chips in Arizona. I guess the Internet isn’t all bad, after all. Oh, that awful tile will be replaced in January.

******************

I have written before that it was on this day in 1963 that Studebaker announced it was ending production in South Bend, Indiana where it had been producing wagons, automobiles, etc. since 1852. I will spare you long prose about the end of Studebaker and just show some cars.

 

See the source image

(From Mecum…)

 

See the source image

(From RM Sotheby’s…)

 

See the source image

(From a WordPress blog…)

 

(From yours truly…)

 

#WhereAreWeWednesday

#PeopleVoteWithTheirFeet

#SayNoToSocialism

#WinstonChurchill

#Transplant

#UTZ!

#Studebaker

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

If you like this blog please tell your friends and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.

 

 

Haphazard Wednesday

From Winston Churchill via The Muscleheaded Blog:

“If we open a quarrel between past and present, we shall find that we have lost the future.”

******************

I disagree with the characterization of socialism as “progressive.” In my opinion it is regressive, it is atavistic. In addition, it runs contrary to one of the basic tenets of human nature: people want to reap most of the rewards of their labor.

******************

My previous comment notwithstanding I can’t believe I am going to quote Marianne Williamson:

“There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people will not feel insecure around you.”

In this cauldron of faux equality and political correctness it is usually considered rude to display exceptional talent. That is sheer, unadulterated b*llsh*t, in my opinion. We should encourage people with real ability to use it and not to hide it. Intelligence is not a disease and it’s not something of which to be ashamed.

******************

More from Winston Churchill:

“You will never reach your destination if you stop and throw stones at every dog that barks.”

Multi-tasking is one of the great myths of the 21st century. Human brains CANNOT multi-task as they were designed to be serial processors, not parallel processors. Do one thing at a time, but commit to do it well.

******************

On this day in 1921 Warren Harding became the first US President to ride to his inauguration in an automobile. Some of you may know what kind of car it was; it was a Packard Twin Six. From Classic Auto Mall a picture of a 1921 Packard Twin Six:

 

1921 Packard Twin Six

 

It seems to me that US Presidents were a little late in adopting the automobile. By the time of Taft’s inauguration in 1909, for example, Cadillac was already well-known as a quality builder of automobiles having won the prestigious Dewar Trophy the year before. Buick offered its first closed body for model year 1909, a limousine no less. They also finished a close second to Ford in production that year.

Back to the Packard…the Twin Six was, of course, powered by a V-12 engine, an amazing feat of engineering and production given the car was introduced in 1915 (as a 1916 model). The Twin Six was noted for its amazing smoothness of operation, its virtual lack of vibration. Packard was the first American car company to offer a V-12 and theirs was the first car engine anywhere to use aluminum pistons.

About 35,000 Twin Sixes were built through June, 1923, which was an impressive number for an expensive car. For its first model year the Twin Six ranged in price from $2,750 to $4,800. Not that the Model T was in the same segment of the automobile market, but a “Tin Lizzie” could be purchased for under $500.

This picture might look familiar:

 

 

Automobile enthusiasts should never forget the contribution made by makes that no longer exist. I would very much like to read your thoughts on this topic.

 

#WinstonChurchill

#PoliticalCorrectnessIsFascism

#PackardTwinSix

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

If you like this blog please tell your friends and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.

 

 

Throwback Thursday

Halloween? My thoughts on the so-called holiday have been expressed before.

******************

On this day in 1959 a song that had been originally composed in 1928 was the Number One song on the Billboard Hot 100. “Mack the Knife” as recorded by Walden Robert Cassoto, better known as Bobby Darin, reached the top position on the charts in early October and stayed there for a total of nine weeks.

 

See the source image

 

From MusicStack a picture of the “Mack the Knife” recording. Growing up in the 1960s and 1970s I had quite a collection of 45s. “Mack the Knife” was not part of that collection. It did, however, sell more than two million copies and was awarded the Grammy as “Record Of The Year.”

Supposedly, Darin did not want the song released as a single. Darin, sadly, had a short life. Having been afflicted with rheumatic fever as a child he had a severely weakened heart and died in 1973 at age 37. Darin had success not only as a singer, but also as an actor and was even nominated for an Academy Award in 1963.

“Mack the Knife” was actually composed for a musical drama called “The Threepenny Opera.” The song’s lyrics were originally in German, but somehow the song became a favorite for American pop and jazz singers to record. For example, Louis Armstrong & His All-Stars released a version that reached #20 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1956.

******************

Making rich people poorer will not make poor people richer.

“Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy; its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.”

– Winston Churchill

******************

No rule says that the Throwback Thursday car has to be from the same year as any other subject of the post. As I do from time to time, here is a chart:

 

Top Ten Selling US Makes, 1950
Chevrolet 1,498,590
Ford 1,208,912
Plymouth 610,954
Buick 588,439
Pontiac 446,429
Oldsmobile 408,060
Dodge 341,797
Studebaker 320,884
Mercury 293,658
Chrysler 179,299

 

Note Studebaker’s position as the only non Big-Three make in the Top Ten. Also note that Studebaker is one of five companies that no longer exists. Although not shown here, the #11, #12, and #13 positions were also held by now-defunct makes. (Nash, DeSoto and Hudson)

 

See the source image

 

From smclassiccars.com a picture of the best-selling vehicle for the best-selling make in 1950. This is a Chevrolet Styleline DeLuxe four-door sedan. By the way, I think the word “Styleline” is awkward to pronounce, but what do I know?

Chevrolet produced more than 316,000 of these in 1950. Note that number would have ranked in the top ten among makes in 1950. Chevrolet produced 14 different offerings across four model lines in 1950. At $1,529 the Styleline DeLuxe four-door was in the middle of the Chevrolet price range.

Chevy offered only two engines in all of those cars: a 216 cubic-inch inline six with an output of 92 HP/176 LB-FT of torque for cars equipped with a manual transmission and a 235 cubic-inch inline six with 105 HP/193 LB-FT for cars equipped with the Powerglide automatic.

This car doesn’t really do anything for me, but for much of the automobile era four-door sedans were the bread and butter for American car companies. Those days are over, probably for good, as SUVs and pickup trucks have become the most popular vehicles.

 

#ThrowbackThursday

#MackTheKnife

#BobbyDarin

#WinstonChurchill

#SayNoToSocialism

#1950USAutoMarket

#1950ChevroletStylelineDeLuxe

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

If you like this blog please tell your friends and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.

 

 

Tuesday Array

On this day in 1962, Johnny Carson became the host of Tonight on NBC; the name of the show was later changed to The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. He hosted the show until May of 1992, which included a move of the venue from New York to California in 1972.

After his death in 2005 word of less than flattering behavior by Carson has emerged. His feud with Las Vegas legend Wayne Newton was known before Carson died. Almost all of us are shadow and shade even if we don’t want to admit it or even understand that “truth.”

I watched the Tonight Show hundreds of times from the late 1960s until I started college in the late 1970s. Often I would only watch Carson’s monologue at the beginning of the show, even if I wasn’t tired. I have never been enamored of listening to “celebrities” so Carson’s interviews with people from TV and movies held little interest for me.

******************

On this day in 1938, Hitler formally annexed the Sudetenland portion of Czechoslovakia following the so-called Munich Agreement. Winston Churchill is supposed to have said to Neville Chamberlain, “You were given the choice between war and dishonour. You chose dishonour and you will have war.” Of course, Churchill was right and in May, 1940 he succeeded Chamberlain as Prime Minister.

Maybe it’s fitting, then, that on this day in 1946 the Nuremberg trials ended with the announcement of the sentencing of the defendants. Twelve of them were sentenced to death. Of the 12 defendants sentenced to death by hanging, two were not hanged: Martin Bormann was convicted in absentia (he had, unknown to the Allies, died while trying to escape from Berlin in May, 1945), and Hermann Göring committed suicide the night before the execution.

Never Forget! Never Again! To all of the anti-Semitic assh*les in the world: Zolst Leegen En Drerd!

******************

Speaking of anti-Semites, on this day in 1908 the Ford Model T was formally introduced. Will Rogers supposedly said this about Henry Ford, “It will take a hundred years to know whether he helped us or hurt us, but he sure didn’t leave us where he found us.”

 

See the source image

 

From inspirationseek.com (I swear that’s the name of the website) comes this picture of a 1908 Model T. About 15,000,000 of these were made through the end of the production run in May of 1927. In 1922 about 1.2 million Model Ts were produced, which represented more than half of all cars sold in the US. In truth, it can be said that the Model T was the car that put America on wheels. Too bad its “creator” was such a despicable person.

******************

Taking a deep breath to compose myself…from gmauthority.com a picture of a stunning concept car by Cadillac that, unfortunately, will never see production:

 

See the source image

 

This is the Cadillac Cien, not to be confused with the Ciel, a four-door convertible concept that does have some small chance of being produced. I believe the Cien was a formal declaration by Cadillac that its much edgier styling (figuratively and literally) is here to stay. I am so tired of the homogenization of vehicles in the US. I would LOVE to see a car that looks like the Cien produced and sold in America.

 

#JohnnyCarson

#TheTonightShow

#WinstonChurchill

#FordModelT

#CadillacCien

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

If you like this blog please tell your friends and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.

 

Sunday Sling

From Winston Churchill by way of Richard Langworth:

 

George Bernard Shaw sent Churchill two tickets to his new play, saying “Come early and bring a friend, if you have a friend.” To which Churchill replied, “I can’t make opening night but I will come the second night, if there is a second night.”

 

Some more from Winston Churchill:

“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.”

“Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy; its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.”

“To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often.”

“The power of man has grown in every sphere, except over himself.”

******************

 

My wonderful wife sent me this…I don’t believe in Santa Claus (did I really need to write that?!), but I still think this is funny.

******************

A: “I’ve never been so insulted in my life!”

B: “You must have been.”

 

A: “I’ve never been so insulted in my life!”

B: “That’s because you don’t get around enough.”

 

One of my favorite TV show exchanges ever (from Everybody Loves Raymond):

Debra Barone: Do you know what I think?

Ray Barone: If I say yes do you still have to tell me?

******************

See the source image

 

From rmsothebys.com a picture of a 1994 Bugatti EB110, which was one of the fastest cars in the world at that time. This is a pre-Volkswagen Bugatti, so it has no disgust factor for me.

These cars were manufactured from 1991 to 1995 at which time the “resurrected” Bugatti company folded and was liquidated. This was the only model produced while Romano Artioli was chairman. The EB110 (“EB” was in honor of Ettore Bugatti, the original company founder) was powered by a small-displacement V-12 (just 3.5 liters) with four turbochargers that produced 552 HP/451 LB-FT of torque in GT spec, but 603 HP/479 LB-FT in Super Sport spec. Only 139 were produced and the base price for the GT was $350,000.

To give you one of many examples of how cars have evolved in just the last quarter-century, my 2016 Z06 has much better performance than this EB110 for a fraction of the price. The EB110 would accelerate from 0-60 MPH in 4.4 seconds; the Z06 will do that in 3 seconds. Until the electric/autonomous cars take over I think we are living in the golden age of automobiles. Enjoy it while it lasts because it won’t last forever.

 

#WinstonChurchill

#BugattiEB110

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

If you like this blog please tell your friends and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.