Fob Mob

 

OK, maybe I got too cute taking a picture of my Z06 key fob against the background of The Genuine Corvette Black Book. My wonderful wife bought her brand new 2018 Corvette in July of 2019 (no typos there). I bought my used 2016 Corvette in March of 2019. Both primary fobs had to have the batteries replaced this week, just one day apart.

For a car that is not cheap, the key fob sure seems to be. To replace the battery requires removing the physical key (the shiny thing at the bottom) and using that to wedge open the fob. It really seems like you’re breaking the fob, but eventually the two halves come apart and the battery can be replaced. Fortunately, it’s a standard watch battery, size 2032.

The fobs began to act up for awhile before they completely stopped working. Fortunately, both times we were home when the fobs ceased to work. Can you imagine leaving a doctor’s appointment only to find you can’t get in your car or start it? Supposedly, a way exists to get around it with the physical key, but I am glad I didn’t have to figure it out and very glad that didn’t happen to my wonderful wife.

I actually have three fobs for my car as the Z06 only came with one when I purchased it and it looked like it had been chewed on by a dog. I bought two new fobs.

Yes, it’s nice to be able to just open the door and start the car with a push of a button, but like EVERYTHING else, modern keyless entry systems are neither all good nor all bad.

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Maybe this should not be a surprise, but yesterday’s Cars A To Z post about Bugatti had almost 50% more views than the post about Alvis. Of course, maybe the difference is just random.

So far this month, Change Is Constant is easily the most viewed post. Would you like to see each month’s most viewed post? I’m not going to show them today and probably only will if there’s some demand for it.

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This picture has nothing to do with anything except I thought it was cool:

 

 

The image reminded me of a Spirograph drawing (as opposed to a Spiro Agnew drawing; OK, bad joke). Do you remember Spirograph?

 

#FobMob

#Spirograph

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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Throwback Thursday 37

In my second year in college two of my dorm mates were Whale and Cutch. (Why I called it my second year and not my sophomore year is explained here.) We got along very well, one reason being we were all rabid sports fans.

Fast forward to today where Cutch and I have lunch once a month and have been doing so for years. Unfortunately, Whale passed away in his sleep last week. When Cutch told me the news I was shocked even though Whale had suffered from numerous health issues, many of which were the result of his weight. Why do you think his nickname was Whale?

Please take care of yourself and Carpe Diem!

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Remember this?

 

See the source image

 

From Etsy a picture of Spirograph. From the Wikipedia article:

 

Spirograph is a geometric drawing device that produces mathematical roulette curves of the variety technically known as hypotrochoids and epitrochoids. The well known toy version was developed by British engineer Denys Fisher and first sold in 1965. The name has been a registered trademark of Hasbro Inc. since 1998 following purchase of the company that had acquired the Denys Fisher company.”

 

I really enjoyed using this when I was in elementary school. Innately I possess no artistic talent, but with Spirograph I could create interesting drawings. How many of you used Spirograph?

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In 1965, the year Spirograph was introduced, the US auto industry set a new production record at 8.8 million units. Ironically, that was also the year that Ralph Nader’s Unsafe At Any Speed was published.

Chrysler produced the last “letter series” car with the 300-L. The first, the C-300, was built in 1955 and is considered by some automotive historians to be an ancestor to the muscle car. From classiccars.com a picture of a 1965 300-L convertible:

 

See the source image

For 1965 these cars were powered by a 413 cubic-inch V-8 engine that produced 360 HP/470 LB-FT of torque. The legendary Torqueflite automatic was the transmission.

Chrysler produced 2,405 300-L hardtops and just 440 convertibles. The hardtop sold for $4,153 and the convertible, as one would expect, stickered for more at $4,618. The total of 2,845 cars was the second highest among letter series cars; 1964 production (the 300-K) was 3,647. In the 11 years the cars were sold, total production was 16,981 units.

 

What do you remember about 1965? I remember that was the year I very reluctantly started kindergarten, but that’s another story for another day.

 

#ThrowbackThursday

#Spirograph

#1965Chrysler300L

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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