Wednesday Wandering

I found this piece on CNBC to be quite interesting. Christina Farr, health-tech reporter for CNBC, stopped using Facebook and Instagram in August after seeing just how much she was using them, particularly Instagram. Her conclusion: I haven’t been back, and I don’t really miss them at all…By about the fourth week into my social media detox, I started thinking about my life differently.

While on Facebook and Instagram, I would see a lot of affirmation for people’s milestones: Their engagements and weddings, their world travels, pregnancies and births, their new jobs. I unwittingly started to think about my life in that way, relegating the in-between periods between these major milestones as mere filler.

If I didn’t have anything worthy of a social media post coming up, I felt that I had nothing very important going on in my life. I’d feel a growing urgency to start planning something big or make a change to stay relevant.

Without social media, that pressure melted away. I started to enjoy life’s more mundane moments and take stock of what I have today — a great job, a wonderful community, supportive friends and so on. I could take my time and enjoy it rather than rushing to the finish line.

In short, I started to feel happier and lighter.

In the aftermath of that realization, I read up on the latest research regarding the impact of frequent social media use. A few recent studies do suggest that I’m not alone: A group of students who limited their social media usage saw a significant decline in depressive symptoms [emphasis mine], and a survey in the U.K. found that Instagram is the most damaging for young people’s mental health.

 

Social media is not the real world. I am aware that some will see that statement as hypocritical coming from someone who blogs almost every day and who has a (very small) presence on Twitter. You are entitled to your opinion and I don’t have to agree with you. Life should not be a crusade to get everyone else to agree with you because NONE of us has a monopoly on truth, wisdom, good taste or good judgment. To quote Shakespeare, “There are more things in heaven and earth…than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

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So, what do you think of the looks of this car?

https://i0.wp.com/www.factorytwofour.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/2017-Jaguar-F-Type-SVR-Convertible.jpg

From factorytwofour.com a picture of a Jaguar F-Type SVR convertible. Is it total heresy to say I like the looks of this car more than those of the legendary E-Type? Do I really care if it is heretical?

I believe I have mentioned this car only one other time on Disaffected Musings, in my Valentine’s Day post to my wonderful wife. She is a big Jaguar fan despite her less than satisfactory experience with the XK-8 convertible she used to own.

The top of the line F-Type has an AWD layout and is powered by a 5-liter supercharged V-8 engine that produces 575 HP/516 LB-FT of torque. I think the exterior design of the F-Type is just about perfect and I think this is one of the few cars that, for me, looks better as a convertible with the top down than in any other configuration.

What do you think?

 

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

 

Everything is a trade off

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/28/jaron-lanier-most-people-in-silicon-valley-have-regrets-right-now.html

I realize that some, or even most, people might think it’s hypocritical for someone who writes a blog (even anonymously as I do) to be so critical of social media. (To tell you the truth, I even think the phrase “social media” is an oxymoron.) Still, the recent news about Facebook should make people think first and post later.

In the CNBC article, Microsoft scientist Jaron Lanier is quoted as saying, “developers knew they were making tech addictive and treating humans like rats in a behaviorist experiment.” He also said that these mechanisms are making society paranoid.

I would hardly be the first person to note that the bubbles in which so many people seem to live are, in large part, due to the Internet and to social media. It’s OK to say no to social media.