16 Tacos

Originally I was going to title today’s post “40 Days and 40 Nights” because, counting today, that’s how much is left of the year 2020. I decided that was too much “on the nose.”

My wonderful wife and I have been in Arizona for about three weeks. In that time I have eaten 16 tacos from Jack In The Box. If any of them are reading I can imagine the reaction of the food fascists, “Ew, those aren’t real tacos. How can you eat that stuff?” Uh, being smug, self-righteous and arrogant is no way to go through life. (Yes, an Animal House reference, sort of.)

I love Jack In The Box tacos. The only concession I’ve made to age is that I order them without the sauce. From the time we left Texas almost 13 years ago until our move here my access to Jack In The Box had been extremely limited. I am making up for lost time.

I doubt I will continue to average almost a taco a day, but I will have them whenever I want. From a site called Serious Eats, a picture of those tacos:

 

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I have a long history with Jack In The Box. I have always been an avid reader. When I was young, a Jack In The Box store was next door to the library where I would borrow books and I would usually get whoever drove me to the library to stop there.

Around the time I began college that store closed as did most others in the eastern half of the country. From about 1980 until I moved to California in 1995 I did not eat at Jack In The Box.

When I moved west I remember waiting at least ten days before I went to one, perhaps in an effort to heighten the anticipation. Of course, I ordered tacos, two at first, but I think I ate at least two more. When I pulled the first one out of its envelope I couldn’t believe it. It looked and smelled exactly the same as I had remembered it and when I took my first bite it tasted exactly the same. I was euphoric.

If you don’t like their tacos, then don’t eat them. Don’t you dare tell me what I should or shouldn’t eat. My life doesn’t belong to you. When you can run three 11-minute miles three times a week (despite painful bunions and arthritis in my feet), then maybe you can have a say. Then again, maybe not.

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Not “remembering” the shooting death of John F. Kennedy today is not an effort at demeaning the significance of the incident. I will say, though, that based on the limited amount of reading I have done, my “theory” is that while Lee Harvey Oswald did intend to kill JFK, he was actually killed by a bullet accidentally fired by a Secret Service agent.

This theory is outlined in the book Mortal Error (published in 1992) by Bonar Menninger. The book is based on the work of Howard Donahue, a gunsmith, sharpshooter and ballistics expert. In 2013, Australian journalist and former police detective Colin McLaren published a book and documentary both titled JFK: The Smoking Gun, examining and supporting Donahue’s theory.

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See the source image

See the source image

 

On this day in 1893, legendary automobile stylist Harley Earl was born. The top picture (from Car Type) is the Buick Y-Job, Earl’s creation and the first “concept car.” The bottom photo (from Classic Cars) is, of course, a 1953 Corvette.

On January 1, 1928, Art and Colour, the automobile industry’s first dedicated styling department, was created by General Motors. Harley Earl was named its head and this department was, essentially, created for Earl by Alfred Sloan, President/CEO/Chairman of GM.

After seeing many cars like the Jaguar XK 120 at an event in Watkins Glen, Earl was inspired to create an American two-seat sports car. On June 2, 1952 he gave Chevrolet Chief Engineer Ed Cole (who eventually became President of GM) a sneak preview of an Art and Color mockup of the “secret” two-seat sports car, code named Opel. Cole loved the idea and pushed for permission to put the car into production. With no offense intended to the memory of Zora Arkus-Duntov, Harley Earl was the real father of the Corvette and Ed Cole also deserves much credit for its creation.

 

#16Tacos

#JackInTheBox

#HarleyEarl

#BuickY-Job

#ChevroletCorvette

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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Keep Reading

My wonderful wife and I want to offer best wishes to our friend, neighbor and regular reader of Disaffected Musings, M. Bless you and be well.

I also want to wish a Happy Milestone Birthday to my childhood friend, RC. For one or two years during elementary school he ate more dinners at our house than at his own.

 

I think reading, real reading and not skimming Fack Fucebook posts or tweets, is a very important activity. Here are some facts from this piece:

 

  • “Extensive reading was linked to superior performance on measures of general knowledge, vocabulary, spelling, verbal fluency, and reading comprehension.” – Cunningham and Stanovich, 1998
  • “In one of the most extensive studies of reading yet conducted, Anderson, Wilson, and Fielding traced reading growth to reading and reading volume. They found that the amount of time students spent reading was the best predictor of reading achievement.” – Anderson, Wilson, and Fielding (1988)
  • “It is clear that reading early in life are critical factors in student success,” – Anthony W. Marx, president of the New York Public Library, New York Times (2015)
  • “Students not reading well in third grade are 4 times more likely to drop out.” – Students First, Statistics About Education in America
  • “Differences in volume of pleasure reading between good and poor readers is massive.” – Cunningham and Stanovich, 1998
  • “Differences in reading volume make an independent contribution to growth in reading and language skills.” –  Mol & Bus, 2011
  • “Research consistently shows strong correlation to reading & academic success at all ages” – National Center for Educational Statistics
  • “Variation in time spent reading can further widen the gap in achievement between good and poor readers. Avoiding this dynamic is one reason why early intervention for reading problems is so important.” – Biemiller, 1999

 

I think much of this country’s ills are due to poor parenting and one of the manifestations of the state of parenting is a generation seemingly unable to read. Parents, granted feeling overwhelmed at times, use electronic devices as de facto babysitters. The path of least resistance is tempting, but it is often not the best path.

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From Bertrand Russell via The Muscleheaded Blog:

“The world is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.”

From Edward R. Murrow via the same source:

“The obscure we see eventually. The completely obvious, it seems, takes longer.”

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From USA Today, of all places, comes a picture gallery of concept cars that didn’t make it to production. From Wikipedia a picture of one of those concept cars and what was the first concept car, the Buick Y-Job of 1938:

 

See the source image

 

That’s Harley Earl at the wheel, by this time a General Motors Vice-President, the first “stylist” to be a VP at a large corporation. The Y-Job, built on a Buick Super chassis, had all manner of advancements that seemed very futuristic for 1938. These included power-operated hidden headlights, electrically operated windows and an electrically powered convertible top.

Earl used the Y-Job as his personal car until 1951. I think the car still looks stylish today more than 80 years after it was built. How much do you suppose it would cost to have a replica built on a modern chassis with a modern drivetrain, suspension, etc.? How much do you think the original, still residing at the GM Design Center, is worth?

 

#KeepReading

#BertrandRussell

#EdwardRMurrow

#ConceptCars

#BuickYJob

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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Gallimaufry

“…a confused jumble or medley of things…”

From this CNBC article comes this chart:

United States 79,595
Japan 17,915
China 16,875
Germany 15,080
Canada 10,840
France 10,120
Hong Kong* 10,010
United Kingdom 9,370
Switzerland 6,400
Italy 5,960

OK, what is it? According to data firm Wealth-X this is the number of Ultra High Net Worth (UHNW) individuals in the ten countries with the most such people. Wealth-X defines UHNW as having a net worth of $30 million or more. By the way, the asterisk next to Hong Kong denotes that it is a “semi-autonomous, special administrative region of China.”

Seven percent of all American households have a net worth of $1 million or more and the number of US households with a net worth of $25 million or more has increased 73 percent since 2008. I have written this data before because I didn’t understand why a wealthy country with so many empty-nester and single-person households seemingly buys nothing but SUVs and pickup trucks. Thanks to my friend Robert I have come to the realization that it is America’s obesity that plays a major role in what vehicles the country’s citizens buy.

I have no problem with wealth as long as it is acquired legally. As I have also written before I believe that money I have legally earned, legally saved and legally invested belongs to me. Government does not have “dibs” on the entirety of a country’s wealth so that it can “fix” wealth distribution. Government exists to protect property rights, not to usurp them.

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Speaking of property:

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From cargurus.com a picture of a 1995 Corvette, the next to last year of the C4 generation. Five years ago I did not care for these cars. The looks seemed bland to me and until the introduction of the “new” LT-1 engine in 1992 these cars were less than spirited performers. As I have often written, however, as I grow older my tastes have changed and I appreciate cleaner lines more. Not that I am going to buy a C4 Corvette, but if I were I would still buy something 1992 model year or newer, preferably 1995 or 1996 because the fuel injectors were improved in 1995 to deal with the effects of the corn farmers subsidy program…I mean ethanol content in gasoline.

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I titled this photo “WTF Buick.” I wish I could remember the source, but it is a picture or rendering of the Buick Avista concept car. Of course, the first concept car was the Buick Y-Job from 1938:

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The photo is from cartype.com. From time to time American automobile manufacturers tease the public with stunning concept cars, but most of them never come close to production. Conceptus Interruptus

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The next Barrett-Jackson auction begins soon so I thought it was about time for another Cristy Lee photo:

 

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From cristylee.tv…

 

 

Y-Job? No, Y-Job!

http://autoweek.com/article/car-life/buick-y-job-jay-leno-drives-first-concept-car-gms-michael-simcoe

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From supercars.net a picture of the first concept car, the Buick Y-Job. This car was “designed” by the legendary Harley Earl (George Snyder probably made the actual drawing) and was produced in 1938. While it was a concept car, it was drivable and, in fact, Harley Earl drove it for years. The car had a Buick straight 8-cylinder engine (modern V-8s were a decade away) and, except for the brakes, was basically a stock Buick Super underneath the body.

See the source image

From ultimatecarpage.com another view of the Y-Job showing the waterfall grille that Buicks still have to this day. Other styling cues from this car would be used in Buicks for at least a decade afterwards.

I would never modify the actual Y-Job if I were to somehow acquire it (I doubt GM will ever sell it or relinquish ownership in any way), but if I were really wealthy I might commission someone to make a faithful replica of the body and then put a modern drive train underneath. Once a resto-modder, always a resto-modder. I think the look is timeless, but the engineering is not.