Frugal Friday, Mazda Edition

This is the 40th consecutive day I have posted. I will definitely not post on Saturday and/or Sunday. <Rant About Viewer Numbers> In the last week the number of viewers has dropped dramatically. I don’t know if that’s a function of summer approaching or just random or whatever. I do know that I do not have an infinite amount of time. It takes me much longer to research and to write each post than it does to read one. Yes, I realize it might be considered silly to complain about lack of readers to people who are reading. Maybe I’m just deluding myself about the quality of this blog. Anyway, I am asking once again that if you like this blog please tell others about it and share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). <End Rant>

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From 56packardman comes this hilarious and yet troubling GIF:

 

 

I have read that more than 6,000 people die every year in the US because they are distracted by their cell phone. I don’t know if that figure includes distracted driving.

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This week’s Frugal Friday was inspired by the most recent episode of Wheeler Dealers where the featured car was a first-generation Mazda RX-7. A shout-out to my friend Carl who owned one of those a long time ago.

 

 

From this Hemmings listing a picture of a 1984 RX-7. Of the seven first-generation RX-7s listed in Hemmings the most expensive was only $16,995. This high-mileage example (about 112,000 miles) is listed at $12,995. It is in Brown over Brown and has a manual transmission although the ad doesn’t seem to indicate if it’s a four-speed or five-speed and I’m not wading through 67 photos to find out.

The RX-7 was, of course, powered by a Wankel rotary engine. Instead of pistons moving up and down inside of cylinders the power is generated by a rotor(s) moving around in a metal casing. All parts rotate in one direction, as opposed to the common reciprocating piston engine, which has pistons instantly and rapidly changing direction 180 degrees. Proponents of this engine claim it is simpler than the standard piston engine, but in the real world problems with oil leakage and emissions doomed it to the dustbin. However, Mazda is supposedly bringing the rotary engine back to be used in a new hybrid power plant.

The RX-7 was a very successful car for Mazda. Over 800,000 were produced in three generations from 1978 to 2002. I think the first-generation has a great look, simple yet stylish.

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Speaking of successful Mazda cars:

 

 

From this Hemmings listing a picture of a 1995 Mazda MX-5 Miata being offered for sale at $6,000. It is another high-mileage car (about 135,000 miles), but at $6,000 you could put another $3,000 in it and still have a nice car for four figures. It is in Dark Blue Metallic over Black with a Black top. Given its year this example is powered by a 1.8 liter/112 cubic-inch inline 4-cylinder engine producing 128 HP/110 LB-FT of torque and is mated to a 5-speed manual transmission.

Being a 1995 this Miata is an NA or first-generation model. The Miata is, of course, still being produced and is currently in the ND or fourth generation. I don’t know if Jeremy Clarkson of Top Gear and The Grand Tour fame really wrote this, but allegedly these are his words:

 

“I realise that the hairy-chested among you will be scoffing and tutting and heading straight for this column on the internet so you can speak your mind. You will say ‘girl’s car’ and ‘gay’ and all sorts of other things.

Well, that’s fine. You waste your money on a Mustang or a Ferrari. The fact is that if you want a sports car, the MX-5 is perfect. Nothing on the road will give you better value. Nothing will give you so much fun. The only reason I’m giving it five stars is because I can’t give it 14.”

 

You could buy both of these cars at the list price, spend $5,000 on repairs and still be more than $10,000 below the average “transaction price” for a new vehicle in the US. Long live Frugal Friday!

 

#Mazda

#FrugalFriday

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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Throwback Thursday: Fins!

Sixty car model years ago (1959 for those of you who are mathematically challenged) the trend of fins on American cars reached its zenith. (Speaking of Zenith does anyone remember the radios and TVs manufactured by the company with that name? “The quality goes in before the name goes on.” They were the first company to develop High-Definition TV in North America.)

 

 

No car epitomized tail fins more than the Cadillac. These pictures are from the 2004 edition of History of the American Auto by the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide®. It is not my intent to blatantly and wantonly violate copyright laws. It’s just that this page is perfect for this post. (To the book publisher: When/if I get paid for this blog let me know how much I need to compensate you. Seriously, a company that would hound me for showing part of one page from an almost 700-page book is out of its mind.) How about this photo of a car that is not a Cadillac:

 

See the source image

 

From pinterest a picture of a 1959 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer. By the way, I have been informed—and am always grateful when I learn something new—that the “Custom” is just part of the name of this car.

The beginning of the “fin era” as it is now known began with the 1948 Cadillac. Whether it was Harley Earl or Frank Hershey who actually had “the light bulb” is not important, in my opinion, but little doubt exists that the fins were inspired by the twin rudders of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning aircraft.

 

See the source image

 

A Barrett-Jackson photo of a 1948 Cadillac Fleetwood Convertible with the tail fins visible. Obviously they are quite modest compared to what fins would look like a decade later. Chrysler chief designer Virgil Exner played a large role in fins becoming more popular with his “Forward Look” design.

 

See the source image

 

A Wikimedia picture of a 1959 Chrysler Windsor. Note the body line rising from front to back, which was a key element in the Forward Look design.

After 1959 fins were phased out rapidly and were “extinct” by 1963 except at Cadillac, which retained the element in its designs into the mid-1960s although in a much less obvious way. From classiccardb.com a rear view of a 1965 Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special Brougham:

 

See the source image

 

In my opinion the ’59 Cadillac tail fins are garish (almost no paradigm of excess is successful), but I like the design of many cars from that era with fins. Here is an example of such a car:

 

See the source image

 

From myclassicgarage.com a picture of a 1957 Oldsmobile 98. I don’t usually like four-door cars, but this one speaks to me in part because of the look of the rear including the fins.

Would any of you like to share pictures/experiences relating to “fin cars?” (No relation to fin tech…)

 

#TailFins

#ThrowbackThursday

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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Compulsion

I wasn’t going to post today, but here I am. As I awoke before 5 AM for the second consecutive day and since I cannot use the treadmill because my wonderful wife is still asleep, here I am. Once again, OCD is a bitch even if it’s OCD-lite.

 

I have been reading Packard: A History of the Motorcar and Company edited by Beverly Rae Kimes. She was, perhaps, the finest chronicler of American automotive history. The book is enormous at 800 pages and with my other wonderful trait, ADD, sometimes I just can’t wade through all of the details about the engineering, the interiors, etc. However, I am enjoying the book.

Would you buy a car without a working master cylinder?

 

 

From this Hemmings listing a picture of a 1956 Packard Executive without a functioning master cylinder. No, I am not going to buy this or any other car anytime soon, but as I have written before my brain is pestering me with the idea of buying a car that was built before I was born and is not too expensive. The seller is asking $8,000.

This was the last model year for the “real” Packard manufactured in Detroit. It was also the only year such cars featured a negative ground, 12-volt electrical system, the standard for cars built in the last 60 years. Of course, that is changing as some manufacturers have moved to a 48-volt system.

While this car will not end up in my Ultimate Garage 2.0 another Packard might. Speaking of Ultimate Garages I am still hoping more of you will send me yours. Not that I can’t post yours after I reveal mine, of course, but some of you might not want to wait until then. I will probably start before Memorial Day.

 

#compulsion

#Packard

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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Happy Birthday, Johnny U!

Before writing about John Unitas I want to mark the passing of another former NFL player, MacArthur Lane. Most of you have never heard of him, but he is the reason I am a Packers fan.

Lane was the St. Louis Cardinals’ first-round pick in 1968 at the age of 26, which is quite old to be drafted by the NFL. Lane did not go straight to college to play football after high school; instead, he worked part time in a machine shop for three years to earn money and went to junior college in Oakland—his hometown—to improve his grades before enrolling at Utah State, where he played with his younger brother, Sidney. MacArthur Lane had a great year for the Cardinals in 1970 earning Pro Bowl honors. Unfortunately for the Cardinals they blew a shot at the playoffs that year by losing their last three games to finish 8-5-1. For some reason, and who can always explain the reasons we form attachments especially as children, I became a big fan of Lane that year.

He was traded to the Packers in February, 1972 and helped lead them to the NFC Central title that season. As Lane became a Packer I became a Green Bay fan and have been ever since. He died on Saturday in Oakland at the age of 77.

“And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

– John Donne

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On this day in 1933 John Unitas was born. He was my favorite football player growing up and is still my favorite football player ever. In some ways Unitas was the Baltimore Colts. Baltimore had always been a blue-collar city and Unitas was the ultimate blue-collar player. His story is well-known: his father dies when he was five, he wasn’t big enough to play at his dream school—Notre Dame, didn’t pass the entrance exam at Pittsburgh, where Unitas was born and raised. After attending Louisville he’s drafted in the 9th round by his hometown Steelers, but was released without ever playing in an exhibition game. After playing a year of semi-pro football for $6 a game, he’s signed by the Colts to back up former first-round pick George Shaw; Shaw gets hurt and the rest is history.

From my football book here is the article I wrote about Unitas as part of the chapter on the 1958 Baltimore Colts:

 

 

Hey, I wrote the book and I don’t need permission to show parts of it here. Sorry my thumb is in the shot of one of the pages.

As I recently wrote it seems to me as though Unitas is not remembered much today. In my opinion, though, the discussion of the best quarterbacks of all time has to start with Tom Brady, Joe Montana, and John Unitas.

 

#JohnUnitas

#MacArthurLane

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Monday Musings

The PA who is the point person for my cardiology care agrees with me, but my other health care providers either don’t or don’t seem to have an opinion. I am convinced that my allergies lead to systemic inflammation. Since the dewpoints have increased (meaning more mold to which I am allergic) I have suffered from pain in my legs, my ribcage, my feet, you name it. My eosinophil count is normal, maybe on the high side of normal. Can certain people have more active/powerful eosinophils that can cause inflammation without a person’s count being abnormal? Any doctors out there are free to chime in.

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On this day in 1889 the Exposition Universelle (World’s Fair in English) opened in Paris with the newly completed Eiffel Tower serving as the entrance arch. OK, interesting but is there an automobile connection? Of course! On the same day Gottlieb Daimler debuted the first car to be shown in Paris, at the opening of the Paris World Exhibition/Fair. Gottlieb did not want to be outshined by the Eiffel Tower so he lined his booth with 30 light bulbs in order to attract people to his stand as electric lighting was still new to the world, as was the automobile. The vehicle was known as the wire wheel car and featured several engineering feats, including a twin cylinder V-engine, not unlike engines used in modern vehicles. attached to a four speed transmission and a groundbreaking cooling system. From automotivehistory.org a picture of Daimler’s car:

 

 

The first cars as we know them now, powered by internal-combustion engines, were developed in Europe not in the US. Depending on whose account you believe, the first car wasn’t built in the US until 1891 or 1893. The four-stroke combustion engine, which still propels the vast majority of cars sold in the world, was primarily developed by a German engineer, Nikolaus Otto, between 1861 and 1876.

The French Peugeot is the oldest make of car in the world. Karl Benz and Gottlieb Daimler may have “invented” the car as we know it, but they did not produce cars as part of their core businesses, nor in a continuous fashion, as early as Peugeot. Some automotive historians credit another French company, Panhard-Levassor, as the first real automobile company, but they ceased production in the 1960s.

Somewhat ironically, Peugeot has been absent from the US market since the early 1990s. Recently, Groupe PSA—parent company of Peugeot—has announced it will re-enter the US market although without announcing a specific year. This car has already been discontinued, but it would be great to see it on US roads:

 

See the source image

 

From motorauthority.com a picture of the Peugeot RCZ. Those Francophiles reading will be able to tell if this is an “R” model; I can’t by sight. Yes, the car looks like an Audi TT, but it’s not German. The RCZ-R was powered by a turbocharged 1.6 liter/98 cubic-inch inline 4-cylinder engine that produced 270 HP/243 LB-FT of torque. Yes, 270 HP/243 LB-FT from 98 cubic inches! Like I keep writing, I think every internal combustion engine in an automobile should be turbocharged, but that costs money and many, if not most, Americans are simply too cheap to ante up.

I hope Peugeot returns to the US and with some exciting cars, not just CUVs and SUVs.

 

#IStandWithIsrael!

#somanycarsjustonelife

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It has been brought to my attention that the photo of Daimler’s car doesn’t appear on all mobile devices. From Wikipedia a picture of what I hope is the same car:

 

See the source image

 

Sunday Lesson

My 2¢ about yesterday’s Kentucky Derby…what happened is a microcosm of a country where outcomes based on merit and competition are, sadly, seen as inherently unfair and where smug, self-righteous and arrogant people believe they have the right to impose outcomes that they think are fair. In the interest of full disclosure, I used to be a co-owner of a thoroughbred race horse.

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It is largely due to government subsidies that the cost of college has risen so dramatically. The price of a good or service can never be lowered by subsidizing demand especially when that good or service has a relatively fixed supply. That fact can actually be used to argue in favor of a plan to wipe out most college debt. HOWEVER, government should then endeavor to stop its ridiculous programs designed to get everyone into college. Two-thirds of high school graduates in academic year T are in college in academic year T+1, an absolutely preposterous proportion in my opinion. It is NOT beneath you or your children to learn a trade and to work with your hands. Part of me still wishes I had attended an automotive trade school after graduating from high school.

In my last college teaching gig less than half the students in my class belonged in college, in my opinion. Don’t get me started on students having almost unlimited flexibility in terms of taking exams.

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From 365 Days of Motoring via Twitter a picture of a Jaguar XKR Coupe. On this day in 1998 Jaguar introduced the XKR variant of the XK-8. It was the company’s fastest accelerating car (at that point); the XKR could accelerate from 0-60 MPH in 5.2 seconds. Twenty-plus years later that’s still fast, even though cars can now be purchased that go 0-60 in three seconds. The XKR didn’t look too bad, either. 🙂

 

#BringBackMerit!

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Pictures For A Saturday

 

Pictures of a nearby lake. We used to live relatively close to this but probably drive by it more often since we moved farther away. The taking for granted of things in close proximity thing…This lake is the center of a nice community in a neighboring state. We actually might have considered living here except the taxes are much higher than where we live.

 

 

Not the first picture of a Metropolitan in this blog; this is a 1956 model so it could really be a Nash Metropolitan. Yes, I think these cars are adorable, so sue me. The cars were built for Nash—and later Hudson and Rambler as well—by Austin in the UK. I believe these were the first cars designed by a US auto company and intended for sale in the US that were built abroad. Almost 95,000 were sold in the US and Canada from 1953-62 and their success played a role, along with the success of the Studebaker Lark and imported cars like the Volkswagen Beetle, in pushing the Big Three to make compact cars.

 

 

Supposedly this is one of the 689 Pontiac Trans Am coupes built in 1969, the first year of the Trans Am. I’ve always liked the white with blue stripes exterior and I really don’t like the color white on cars, exterior or interior. A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.

 

 

This is a picture of the gorgeous Flavia Watson. (I believe the photo is from Spotify.) Remember the name…

 

 

From Scottsdale in January of 2019 a picture of a 1990 Toyota Sera. I had never seen one before; I had never heard of this car before. About 16,000 of these were built from February, 1990 and December, 1995. Some of them, like this 1990 model, can be legally imported into the US.

 

 

A picture of a sunrise in Scottsdale in January, 2019. The colors in the sky at sunrise and sunset almost don’t look real.

 

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Frugal Friday, Pony Car Edition

Allergies have much the best of me today. Hope that doesn’t show in this post. I think with the recent increase in dewpoint comes an increase in mold to which I am quite allergic. Add that to abundant pollen and I’m struggling. Do drier climates have less mold? If so, another argument for moving to such a climate.

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I asked this of WordPress and only received a “partial” answer. Do any of you bloggers out there know if an increase in referrals from search engines is significant? For April, the number of such referrals was greater than the total for January through March combined. The percentage of total views for April that were referred from search engines was more than twice that of January-March.

I am hoping such an increase is a harbinger of a gain in viewers. Of course, if any of you Grade A “social media influencers” are reading a recommendation would be much appreciated. 🙂

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As the post title suggests today’s Frugal Friday is about pony cars. (Who leaves a country packed with ponies to come to a non-pony country? Yes, a Seinfeld reference. Sue me…)

The current US pony car market consists of the Chevrolet Camaro, Dodge Challenger and Ford Mustang. Camaro sales have slumped to the point where it is now last in this segment. In 2017, the Camaro outsold the Challenger 67,940 to 64,537, but for 2018 through the first quarter of 2019 the Challenger outsold the Camaro 80,147 to 63,046. For the same period Ford sold 92,759 Mustangs. Note that for the last five quarters almost a quarter-million pony cars were sold. I think some segment of the car-buying market still wants a good-looking performance car.

Using autotrader.com I searched for these three cars for model years 2010-2012 with V-8 engines and fewer than 60,000 miles. I also used a 200-mile search radius from my house as I suspect a nationwide search would yield too many vehicles. I like the fact that Autotrader lets you search for multiple makes/models simultaneously. I exercised some discretion in terms of cars that seemed acceptable based on the photos and the ad copy.

When sorting the results by price from lowest to highest it seems as though the Mustang dominates the lower priced segment of this market. Not many Challengers were found near the bottom of the price sort. Of course, I don’t really know how much these cars cost when new.

 

Used 2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS Coupe w/ 2SS Thurmont, MD 21788 - 509296719 - 4

 

A picture of a 2010 Camaro SS Coupe with the 2SS trim package in Red Jewel Tincoat over Beige. This car has about 51,000 miles and the seller, a Chevrolet dealer, is asking $16,888. I think these cars look good and pay homage to the first-generation styling. Having driven both a fifth-generation and sixth-generation Camaro I can say that the cars have large blind spots to the rear. This car has a 6-speed automatic.

 

Used 2010 Dodge Challenger R/T Fredericksburg, VA 22408 - 502646122 - 3

 

This is a 2010 Dodge Challenger in Silver over Black. Like the Camaro I think these cars are well-styled and are a good updating of the original design. This car has a manual transmission and has about 56,000 miles. The seller is asking $16,990.

 

Used 2011 Ford Mustang GT Premium PASADENA, MD 21122 - 506686307 - 1

 

This is a 2011 Ford Mustang GT in Grey over Cream. I don’t dislike Mustangs, but I am not a huge fan of them, either. Still, I appreciate the significance of the model and understand the rabid fandom it generates in many people. This ’11 has an automatic transmission, has about 57,000 miles and the seller is asking $17,866.

 

Here are three good-looking pony cars with V-8s, each at far less than $20,000. Remember that the average “transaction price” for a new vehicle in the US is approaching $40,000. Life is far too short; have some fun!

 

#FrugalFriday

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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I was negligent, to say the least, in failing to mention Yom HaShoah yesterday. Never Forget! Never Again!

 

 

 

Throwback Thursday

Yesterday’s late-session stock market selloff is an indication, to me, that even traders/investors and their algorithms are coddled and spoiled. The market sold off because the Fed did not indicate that its next rate move would be a cut. OK, after a 3.2% GDP print for the first quarter of 2019 and continuing strong job growth why on Earth should the Fed indicate the next move is a cut?! The fact “markets” thought that should be the base case doesn’t mean the markets were right.

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More about Gino Marchetti:

 

See the source image

 

“Everybody goes to Gino’s, ’cause Gino’s is the place to go.

Everybody goes to Gino’s, everybody in the know.”

The above photo is from flickr. The Gino’s jingle is well-known to people my age who grew up in Baltimore. Yes, the Gino in Gino’s is for Gino Marchetti who partnered with fellow Colt Alan Ameche along with Joe Campanella and Louis Fisher to found the brand. The Gino Giant, an almost identical sandwich to the Big Mac®, was introduced two years before McDonald’s effort. My introduction to KFC was through Gino’s because they offered KFC chicken.

When the Gino’s company was sold to Marriott in 1982 it had over 350 locations. Marriott discontinued the brand and converted the stores remaining open to be Roy Rogers restaurants. The brand was revived in 2010 as Gino’s Burgers and Chicken, but has not had much success.

Gino’s was my favorite fast-food restaurant as a child into my early teens although I was also a fan of Jack In The Box, which still had locations in the east. The day after I broke my foot playing football in May of 1972, my parents—in one of the last things they did together before my father moved out—bought me a giant bag of food from Gino’s in an effort to cheer me up.

“Everybody goes to Gino’s, ’cause Gino’s is the place to go.

Everybody goes to Gino’s, everybody in the know.”

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See the source image

 

From classiccars.com a picture of a 1970 Corvette. Around the same time I was eating at Gino’s I loved these cars; I loved the Mako Shark concept car that was the basis for the C3 Corvette. I thought the C2 design was boring! Kids, what do they know?!

One of the few things my father and I did together was to attend the annual Baltimore auto show. (I picked a 1970 model to show because the Orioles won the World Series in 1970 and the Baltimore Colts won the Super Bowl for the 1970 season.) In those days auto shows were more about concept cars than about car makers trying to get people interested in buying their new models. I know I had picture postcards of the Mako Shark, but they are long gone.

1970 is considered the high-water mark of the muscle car era (yeah, that’s really why I showed a ’70 Vette). Beginning in 1971, net HP figures were displayed instead of gross and real HP output fell because of tightening emissions standards and rising insurance rates. Compression ratios were lowered, cams were made less aggressive, etc. For 1970 the highest HP engine for the Corvette was the 454 cubic-inch big block that produced 390 HP; the 350 cubic-inch ZR1 small block produced 370 HP. By 1975 the highest HP for a Corvette engine was 205 and the base engine produced just 165 HP.

Today I think the C2 Corvette is the most beautiful American car ever and I think the C3 looks a little dated, especially early in the run. It’s OK to change your mind, by the way. I once knew someone—he was actually one of the best men at my wedding—who refused to change his mind or the way he thought about anything. I haven’t spoken to him in about ten years.

 

#GinoMarchetti

#GinosHamburgers

#ThrowbackThursday

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Wayfaring Wednesday

See the source image

 

From profootballhof.com a picture of the late, legendary Gino Marchetti, presumably on the day of his induction to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Marchetti died on Monday at the age of 93.

He played for the Baltimore Colts from 1953 to 1964, “retired” and then came back to play in 1966. His pro career actually started for the Dallas Texans in 1952; the Texans folded in the middle of that season and the franchise, what was left of it, was moved to Baltimore for 1953.

Here is a Gino Marchetti story by way of his coach Weeb Ewbank that I recounted in my football book, the one for which Mel Kiper wrote the forward:

“We were having trouble once with a young player from Kent State. He was lining up against Gino in practice and Gino was just going boom, boom—right by him. He told the kid, ‘You’re up too high. Get lower.’ The guy got lower and Gino, with that powerful torso of his, gave him a fake and a shove and knocked the kid down and went by him. The coach told the kid to get even lower. This time Gino went straight at him, put his hands on the kid’s shoulders and leap-frogged over him. The kid said, ‘Now what do I do?’ John Unitas was standing there watching. He said, ‘You just applaud, that’s all.'”

Marchetti was a member of the NFL’s 50th anniversary all-time team, which was announced in 1969. Next season will be the NFL’s 100th, an event the league is hyping to no end. Forrest Gregg, Packers Hall of Fame offensive tackle who passed away very recently, said this about Marchetti, “You ask who was the best … just my opinion, Marchetti was the best all-around player I ever played against. Great pass rusher. Great against the run. And he never let you rest.”

I haven’t mentioned that Marchetti enlisted in the U.S. Army after graduating from high school and fought in the famous Battle of the Bulge during World War II as a machine gunner. The petulant, coddled, moronic pro athletes of today—who seem to be too numerous—should take a lesson from Marchetti’s life.

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In large part due to Bill James’ tweeting the main link to this blog (thanks again, Bill; you can tweet/re-tweet links to the blog anytime), April set a “record” for views in a month. March and April set a “record” for most views in a two-month period. Thanks for reading.

22% of all views in April were on the day of Bill’s tweet and the day after. (OK, not supposed to start a sentence/paragraph with a number; in all honesty I think many people’s eyes would glaze over at “twenty-two.”) In fact, about two percent of all views since I began writing Disaffected Musings occurred on the day of the tweet. This is post number 429 and day number 476 for this blog.

As I note at the end of virtually every post, if you like this blog please keep reading, please let your friends know and please share the blog URL (https://disaffectedmusings.com). Thanks.

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A picture I took of a beautiful 1942 Cadillac Series 62 convertible. Trying to tie this back to Gino Marchetti, 1942 was the last model year for US automobile production until after the end of World War II as manufacturing of cars ceased in February, 1942. Only 308 of these cars were built; about 3,100 were made in 1941.

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A postscript to the portion of yesterday’s post about awful customer service in America: my wonderful wife was not having a good work day, either, so she asked me if I wanted to get The Red Rocket titled in our state and get plates. Actually, *plate* is more accurate as, thankfully, only one plate needs to be displayed on cars where we live.

We have all heard horror stories of trips to the DMV that take hours and hours. We were in and out in 20 minutes and I have never spent more than a half hour at any DMV center in this state. Be thankful for small favors, I guess.

 

#GinoMarchetti

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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