Tuesday Trial And Error

 

Can you read this chart? This is from the sales brochure my wonderful wife was given when…well, I am actually not sure if she received this during a trip to our closest Chevrolet dealer when she tried to buy a Corvette there or if it was given to her at the dealer from whom she actually purchased her new Corvette. In any event it’s actually a 2019 brochure and she bought a 2018 model, albeit still brand new.

Note the 0-60 and quarter-mile times in the chart for the Z06: 2.95 seconds 0-60 and 10.95 seconds for the quarter-mile. OK, so it’s really three seconds and eleven seconds; still, those are insane times. Also note the skidpad g rating: 1.2g with the Z07 package. Top speed isn’t listed on the chart, but the speedometer in my 2016 Z06 tops out at 220. You know, I think it’s time for another picture of my Z06:

 

 

Since this car has the Z07 package it has the larger brake rotors that are also made of carbon-ceramic. How large? At over 15 inches in diameter both front and rear it would seem that they are bigger than the wheels for the C3 Corvette, which were 15 inches. Maybe someone can tell me if I am comparing apples to apples.

Of course it is now just nine days until the official reveal of the C8 Corvette. I think Chevrolet/GM are taking a gamble introducing a mid-engine design for a car with such iconic history, but I wish them well.

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In the idiom of “the more things change, the more they stay the same” here is the intro to this post titled “Voices from 1900-1914.”

 

Below are a few dozen voices from the early twentieth century, culled from Philipp Blom’s The Vertigo Years: Europe, 1900-1914. In an almost uncanny way their concerns aren’t much different than ours: there’s worry over the spread of new technology and its invasion into and cheapening of everyday life; a deep paranoia over changes in previously stable gender roles, with a resulting exaggeration of masculinity and a lashing out at even the hint of homosexuality; a faith in progress and the harnessing and collation of data, whether in science or culture, which leads either down the rabbit hole of racial theories and eugenics, or just in rigid artistic theories and groups. And there is a feeling of utter powerlessness in the face of science, culture, and rapid change, and our perpetual fear of civilization’s collapse. They are all right here, a hundred years ago:”

 

I have commented in this blog that young people today seem to have total faith in “the new” unmindful of the past and of the fact that since human beings aren’t perfect neither are their inventions or institutions. Maybe all of us suffer from temporal arrogance to some degree.

What do you think?

 

#C7Corvette

#2016ChevroletCorvetteZ06

#EverythingOldIsNewAgain?

#somanycarsjustonelife

#disaffectedmusings

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2 thoughts on “Tuesday Trial And Error

  1. I would say that forty-five years ago, you and I thought adults were idiots. We were half right. I think what we are seeing is the fringe on both sides having access to larger and more powerful megaphones, and we older folks are becoming more easily triggered. We have to admit that much of what is screwed up in the world, the elders did it, including the raising of entitled brats.

    PS, your car looks “marvelous”!!!
    PPS, IMHO, if the new corvette has the soul of its predecessors, I don’t know if folks will care where the engine is. I am reminded of the hand wringing over the water cooled Porsches, which are now suddenly hot collectibles. “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose”

    Like

    1. Thanks, sir. I loved your inclusion of this, “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.”

      Everyone has access to larger and more powerful megaphones, which negates the advantage of being intelligent and thoughtful. Sounds arrogant? Don’t care…intelligence is not a disease, it’s not something of which to be ashamed.

      Like

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