Friday Fries

See the source image

 

From newyork.seriouseats.com a picture of my favorite french fries, the ones from Five Guys. I don’t care how many calories or how many grams of fat they have; they taste great! Almost anything is OK in moderation. Besides, I exercise regularly: 30-45 minutes of running three days a week. I’m fairly certain that, except in extreme circumstances, diets of extreme exclusion are not optimal.

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Disaffected Musings has readers in the UK. I would very much like to read thoughts from those folks on the results of yesterday’s election. I can’t say I am disappointed that the political career of Labour’s leader, whom I will not mention by name, is probably over. I am not a fan of socialist anti-Semites.

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This CNBC article from yesterday reports of a possible FTC injunction against the criminal organization known as Facebook, or as I call it, Fack Fucebook. From the article:

 

 

“The injunction would likely seek to block Facebook from enforcing policies around how its apps interact and could keep the company from pushing forward with its plans to integrate its three messaging services, sources told the Journal. Some officials have expressed concern that Facebook’s plans to integrate Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger could make it harder to unwind those acquisitions later on if the FTC chooses to seek such a remedy, a source told the Journal.”

 

I wish nothing but plague and pestilence on that evil company and its leaders.

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Charles Williams Nash resigned as President of General Motors on June 1, 1916. GM founder William Durant had regained control of the voting stock of the company in May and despite being offered an annual salary of $1 million (worth about $25 million today) to stay with GM, Nash did not want to work with Durant.

That feeling is understandable as Nash had been promoted to President of GM in November of 1912 and cleaned up the mess that Durant had made before he was fired by the board of directors in 1911. Nash restored GM to organizational and financial health.

Anyway…Nash bought the Jeffery Company in 1916 and renamed it Nash Motors in 1917. He ran the company with a tight fist, which helped save it during the Great Depression. He retired in 1937.

Long way around…the company that bore the Nash name, in conjunction with British sports car builder Donald Healey, manufactured the Nash-Healey car, the first real two-seat, post-war production sports car made for the US market. People who don’t believe in luck should read this…Donald Healey was returning to Britain on the Queen Elizabeth ocean liner after unsuccessfully lobbying Cadillac to supply him with engines. On the same voyage was Nash-Kelvinator CEO George Mason. Healey and Mason met, bonded over their interest in photography, and reached a deal for Nash to provide the drivetrain for Healey’s project. The car, simply called the Nash-Healey, debuted in 1951, two years before the Corvette.

For the second year of production legendary Italian coach builder Pinin Farina redesigned the body and a classic (IMO) was born. From Bring a Trailer a picture of a 1952 Nash-Healey:

 

See the source image

 

The car’s price, more than $4,000 in 1951 when a Cadillac Series 62 convertible could be purchased for less than $4,000 and Nash wasn’t exactly a Cadillac competitor, no doubt doomed the project. Only 506 were built from 1951 through 1954.

One of these cars figures prominently in an episode of American Pickers. The “Pickers,” Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, buy two of these from a father and son who own four of them. The one Mike buys proves quite stubborn in being moved and after a heavy thunderstorm begins attempts to free the car are halted.

I think these are stunning cars to behold and while the Nash engine, a 125 HP inline six, was no powerhouse remember that Healey had intended for the car to have a Cadillac V-8. The engine bay was large enough for such a motor and some cars, like the one Mike Wolfe purchased, did have Cadillac engines installed to replace the Nash motor.

 

#FridayFries

#DeathToSocialism

#IStandWithIsrael

#NashHealey

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Thursday Thoughts

It’s twenty days until 2020. I wish I could find some solace in that symmetry of numbers. My mood is usually more depressed than usual at this time of year and I believe it’s because I see the end of a year that will never return, one fewer opportunity to achieve something of note or of real and lasting satisfaction.

 

 

That is an admittedly less than sharp picture of the full moon taken early this morning. (I will never have skills like photobyjohnbo. Besides, I was really cold and didn’t want to stay outside any longer than necessary, even to take this picture.) Like many people I used to stay up late and sleep late. Now, I don’t sleep as many hours per day and enjoy waking up before sunrise.

******************

I wish I could believe this Hagerty article titled, “Don’t believe the hype, car enthusiasm is safe with the next generation.” Here is the first paragraph:

 

“It’s 10 p.m. Do you know where your children are? Most likely, they’re right upstairs, awake to the cool blue glow of a screen. They could be keeping up with an Instagram celebrity you’ve never heard of, or they might be texting with a friend about a text from another friend (multiple studies confirm kids prefer messaging to actual conversation). The Economist, among others, reports today’s kids are remarkably socially conservative, so perhaps they’re just doing homework.”

 

Here is another paragraph later in the piece:

 

“These days, we typically talk about the Woodward Avenues of America in the context of our automotive past. Young people, the popular thinking goes, can’t be bothered with cars. They’re too obsessed with their phones, their Instagram feeds, and their avocado toast. But it seems no one’s told the skinny kid in a hopped-up Neon SRT4, the sound of its overboost ricocheting off the concrete overpass at the Woodward and Eight Mile intersection, that he’s supposed to be inside staring at his iPhone. Or the guy in his Pontiac G8 with a ‘not stock, not stock’ idle.”

 

So, what do you think? I suspect the demographic of Disaffected Musings readers skews older than the nationwide median. Do you care what happens to the car hobby in the next 10-20 years? Do you sense genuine interest in automobiles among younger people?

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A car like the one shown below has appeared in at least two episodes of Iron Resurrection on Motor Trend. My understanding is that the show will return for its fourth season beginning in January. When they are working on cars in which I have interest I usually enjoy watching. When they are working on pickup trucks or motorcycles, I don’t watch.

For the most part the crew seems likeable although to me, and I know this aspect could be a creation of the show’s producer(s), Shorty doesn’t really seem like a nice person. Of course, Amanda Martin is very easy on the eyes. Anyway…

 

See the source image

 

From Barrett-Jackson a picture of a 1966 Chevrolet Nova SS. I think the ’66-’67 Nova is a smart, handsome design. About 36,000 Novas with V-8 engines were produced in 1966 with about 16,000 of those being SS models.

This car, which weighed only about 2,900 pounds with a V-8, could be purchased with a 327 cubic-inch engine that produced 350 HP/360 LB-FT of torque. That wouldn’t be a bad power-to-weight ratio even today. I don’t think the 327/350 HP engine was available with an automatic transmission.

If I had a nine-figure net worth I might buy a car like this. Even at two letters, “if” might be the biggest word in the English language.

 

#ThursdayThoughts

#1966ChevroletNovaSS

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Wednesday Adventure(r)

Why wasn’t this car put into production?!

 

See the source image

 

From the invaluable en.wheelsage.org a picture of the 1953 DeSoto Adventurer I concept car. DeSoto did produce a car with the model name Adventurer from 1956-1960, but it didn’t look anything like this. Designed by the legendary Virgil Exner this was his “…favorite car always.” More from Exner courtesy of this and this, “If it had been built, it would have been the first four-passenger sports car made in this country. Of course, it had the DeSoto Hemi [a 1953 stock 273 with 170 horsepower]. It was my favorite car always…” From the same article, “Exner tried very hard to get the DeSoto Adventurer approved for limited production. But as Maury Baldwin, one of his staffers, later recalled, ‘Management at that point was very stodgy. A lot of people attributed it to the old Airflow disaster. They were afraid to make any new inroads.'”

No one knows, of course, how this car would have sold if it had been available. However, the 1950s were a time of ostentatiousness, at least to some degree, and this car certainly would have stood out. One can understand the notion of “Once burned, twice shy,” but it’s a shame Chrysler management couldn’t or wouldn’t understand how circumstances had changed since the 1930s when the Airflow was introduced. Like another Mopar product of the same vintage—the Chrysler Ghia ST Special—I simply can’t take my eyes off this car.

“A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness…”

– John Keats

 

#DeSotoAdventurerI

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Wandering Through The Wilderness

A very random post today…

 

Jim Cramer’s take in this CNBC piece is, in my opinion, at the intersection of fact and opinion, of politics and economics, and might be of interest to those of you who are not blindly partisan.

“Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.”

– Aldous Huxley

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From Carl Sagan via The Muscleheaded Blog:

“Books break the shackles of time—proof that humans can work magic.”

I have to admit that one strong motivation for writing my first published book was to leave proof that I was here.

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Given my 20+ year career in major league baseball, some who know me have asked my opinion on the selection of Marvin Miller to the Baseball Hall of Fame. In case you don’t know, or even if you do, Miller was the Executive Director of the Major League Baseball Players Association from 1966 to 1982. It was during his tenure that players successfully bargained for the right to salary arbitration and for arbitration, in general, to decide unresolvable matters between players and owners. It was through this arbitration process that baseball players gained the right to be free agents. Prior to that they had been bound for life to the team that first signed them and the only way they could change teams is if they were traded or released.

Anyway…my answer has been “I don’t care.” Back to free agency…a former friend of mine used to rail against players being able to be free agents. He once asked me, “Why can’t teams have rights of first refusal so that if they match another offer the player can’t leave?” I replied, “This is the United States of America and after four years or six years a player should be able to choose where he wants to play. In other industries, in the absence of a contract a person is free to choose an employer if offered a job.” He had no reply.

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I have publicly and privately thanked 56PackardMan for putting links to my posts about Studebaker and Packard on the appropriate forums. He did that again yesterday and, not surprisingly, the number of views for the day was higher than normal—about twice the average for 2019, in fact. What I would like to read from you is how I can get these people to keep reading this blog even when the subject isn’t Studebaker or Packard.

His blog is not just about defunct American car companies, either. While I don’t always agree with his views I respect his right to express them. Today his post is about Brexit. I think it’s not the most appropriate thing for me to tell the Brits what to do, but I do believe that democracy does not mean conducting elections until one side gets the result it wants.

Our local school district was able to hold three special elections in something like 18 months or 2 years in an attempt to gain approval for a sharp increase in property tax rates. In the first two elections their attempt was unsuccessful, but in the third election—without much publicity—they gained approval although of an admittedly lesser increase. That whole process is absurd. Such votes should only be held during normal election years at the time of that election, period. This is yet another example of why I loathe and despise politics.

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So, is a Disaffected Musings post really a Disaffected Musings post without an automobile reference? Are you tired of reading about and seeing Corvettes and Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawks?

My passion for automobiles is (obviously) genuine, but I have to admit that sometimes I post automotive content because I think that’s what the majority of readers want.

 

#Wandering

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The End At South Bend

“Borrowing” liberally from the excellent Studebaker 1946-1966, The Classic Postwar Years by Richard Langworth, I mean why reinvent the wheel?

 

 

“MONDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1963 [sic] was a perfect day for a funeral in South Bend. A bitter wind from the north whipped freezing drizzle into stinging spray as the shift reported to work at seven in the morning—the same time, the same place that people had come to work for the last 111 years. The plants’ flags flew ominously at half-mast, though the reason had nothing to do with the fortunes of the company: President John F. Kennedy had been assassinated in Dallas two weeks before.”

“Inside, production cranked up as usual, albeit on a very reduced scale. But it was warm inside, cars and trucks were rolling, and Monday wouldn’t last forever. To ninety-nine percent of the 7,000-person work force, it was just another gloomy midwestern morning, to be borne as all the others had, for Christmas wasn’t far away.”

“But Christmas never came.”

“Down on the truck assembly line around ten o’clock, chief union steward Earl Townsend was approached by a truck driver—one of those who traditionally picked up news early. ‘Studebaker’s shutting down the plant for good!’ the driver told him breathlessly. Townsend didn’t believe it. He consulted with the men on the line; none of them had heard the rumor. One labeled it ‘another dirty management trick to scare us.’ Townsend picked up a phone and dialed the office of UAW Local Number Five. Busy. He called again and again. It remained busy. As the shift broke for lunch, nobody really knew if the shocking story was true. It was noticed that a few old-timers made for the company credit union. They were going to withdraw their lives’ savings.”

“By 1 PM, the rumor was so rife that management decided to make it official. It was expected now, but it was still a jolt. The afternoon edition of the South Bend Tribune bannered, ‘AUTO OUTPUT TO END HERE. Studebaker Will Assemble Cars in Canada.’ The shock waves reverberated over telephone and telegraph lines from South Bend across the land…”

 

 

Of course, with today’s 24/7/365 news cycle and thousands of online news “sources,” this story would have been broken sooner AND forgotten sooner. Obviously, I wanted to note this anniversary of the announcement of the end of Studebaker production in South Bend, Indiana. Yes, the story means more to me because Studebaker is a defunct American car company. However, it is a sad tale of a once proud manufacturer whose history began before the Civil War, a manufacturer that made many missteps whose impacts were compounded by market forces beyond their control.

By the way, production continued at the South Bend plant—more to use up spare parts than to produce finished cars—until December 20th. I have read that the very last car built was an Avanti—serial number R-5643—but corroboration is scarce. Supposedly, the car had the ironic message “Merry Christmas” written on it. From connorsmotorcar.com a picture of a 1964 Studebaker Avanti:

 

See the source image

 

Studebaker aficionados are free to point out any inaccuracies in the pictured car. If you are a genuine car person, though, also remember the long history of the company and of the defunct manufacturers that, despite their final fate, contributed much to the car world as we know it.

 

#EndAtSouthBend

#EndOfStudebaker

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Most Valuable Pontiac

First…I can’t stand the overtime rules in college football. (No, I wasn’t rooting for Baylor to win yesterday.) Why don’t they just have a field-goal contest? Besides, why is a tie so awful? It’s just a game; it’s not life or death. Whatever happened to concern for the safety of student-athletes? What will happen when a game goes into 19 overtimes and the final score is 146-144?

I have a theory that college football’s preposterous overtime rules, one of which is the game cannot end in a tie, have their roots in the 1966 Michigan State-Notre Dame game, which was played late in the season. Both teams were undefeated and ranked 1-2 in the national polls. With the score at 10-10 Notre Dame took possession of the ball on its own 30-yard line with a little over a minute left. Notre Dame coach Ara Parseghian, in essence, played for the tie as his team did not make any attempt to move the ball into range for a potential game-winning field goal.

The late Dan Jenkins, one of the most decorated and respected sportswriters ever, led off his Sports Illustrated article about the 1966 game by writing Parseghian chose to “Tie one for the Gipper.” That open is a play on the famous, if not completely factual, remark supposedly made by Notre Dame star George Gipp, who—as the fable goes—on his deathbed in 1920 at the age of 25 urged the Fighting Irish to “Win one for the Gipper.” Parseghian was criticized almost universally and I think the criticism had much resonance all over college football. Of course, given how the NCAA “works” overtime wasn’t adopted until 1996 for all Division I games. Sorry, I will not use the stupid FBS and FCS designations. Overtime was introduced in 1981 for playoff games below the Division I level.

I think NFL overtime rules are better although far from perfect. I would only have overtime for playoff games, but each team would be guaranteed one possession regardless of the result of the first possession in overtime.

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The reaction to posts like Most Valuable Packard has been very good. (What do you know? I wrote about college football in that post, too.) As you can surmise by today’s post title, I will show the Most Valuable Pontiac according to the 2019 Collector Car Price Guide by Krause Publications. Without further ado:

 

See the source image

 

From the rmw.lv website a picture (hopefully) of a 1961 Pontiac Catalina 2-door hardtop with the 421 Super Duty engine. According to the Krause book, one of these in Grade 1, concours-quality condition is worth $250,000. These 1961 models were really factory-produced, barely street-legal drag cars.

According to Encyclopedia of American Cars by the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide®, the twin four-barrel 421 Super Duty engine had 373 HP in 1961, but 405 HP in 1962. This is probably another case where the factory understated the output; by 1962 the real output was more likely 450 HP/500 LB-FT of torque. Pontiac engines of this era were known for their torque. According to the NHRA rules of the day, at least 50 of these had to be made in order for the cars to qualify for Super Stock class. I have not been able to find a production number, but I’m going to guess it wasn’t much higher than 50.

A quarter of a million dollars for a Poncho! Too bad Pontiac is no more.

 

#BooOnCollegeFootballOvertime

#MostValuablePontiac

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Remember The Day

Of course, this is the 78th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the event that brought the United States into World War II. An almost unfathomable set of developments has happened in the world since then, much of which could not have been imagined at the time. Japan and the US are allies, for example. Still, we should remember this day to honor those who sacrificed so much that day and on subsequent days.

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As a consequence of the US entry into World War II, American production of automobiles for civilian use ended early in 1942. Production would not resume until the second half of 1945. When production did restart virtually all US car companies offered warmed-over pre-war models. To be fair, the time, money and effort needed to develop new models and retool for production of same precluded automobile manufacturers from “hitting the ground running.”

The only exception was a company that did not exist before the war, Kaiser-Frazer. Formed from the leftovers of Graham-Paige, Kaiser-Frazer offered a new car because that was the only car it could offer. The car it produced was actually less revolutionary than it might have been. At first, Kaiser-Frazer considered building a car based on the K-85 prototype, a front-wheel drive car featuring four-wheel independent suspension through the use of longitudinal torsion bars. It proved to be too impractical and too costly to build, especially given the technology of the time.

A tangent: Studebaker devotees will argue that the company produced a “new” car at about the same time, maybe even slightly before, the first Kaiser-Frazer automobiles were sold. However, Studebaker’s first post-war car, named the Skyway Champion, was just a slightly modified version of the 1942 Champion models sold before the war. The Skyway Champion gave way to a new car, also called Champion, in May, 1946 as a 1947 model year car. Studebaker also added a “higher class” model, the Commander—also a resurrected name, for model year 1947.

 

See the source image

 

From kfclub.com a picture of a 1947 Kaiser Special. The Kaiser and Frazer were the “…cars [that] had the first true postwar sheet metal with envelope bodies and fenderlines that ran from front to rear in an unbroken contour.” I am quoting standard catalog of® American Cars, 1946-1975 by John Gunnell.

Other than the styling, both the Kaiser and Frazer were conventional cars. The standard engine for both was a 226 cubic-inch, inline-six that produced 100 HP/180 LB-FT of torque. Both cars had three-speed manual transmissions with overdrive as an option.

At first, the cars were well-received reaching a combined sales mark of about 140,000 for both 1947 and 1948. As the Big Three introduced its all new postwar cars, that included innovations like an overhead-valve, oversquare, “high” compression V-8 engine in addition to more modern styling, Kaiser-Frazer (and all independents) struggled to maintain market share. Although a dramatic restyle for 1951 along with the dropping of the Frazer make led to a temporary boost in Kaiser sales for that year, sales plummeted thereafter and forced Kaiser to end US auto production and sales in 1955. As I have written before, although I’m not sure if it was company co-founder Henry or his son Edgar who said this, one of the Kaisers remarked, “Slap a Buick nameplate on it and it would have sold like hotcakes.” We’ll never know, of course.

 

#RememberTheDay

#1947Kaiser

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Frugal Friday, “Mutt and Jeff” Edition

Has it really been eight days since Thanksgiving?!

 

Examples of this car can actually be found for even less money, but those cars have many more miles and/or “extenuating” circumstances, such as being flood-damaged. From AutoTrader a picture of a 2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T:

 

Used 2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T Parkersburg, WV 26101 - 535512308 - 5

 

As the name indicates, this car is powered by a 2-liter, 4-cylinder turbocharged engine. That motor produces 210 HP/223 LB-FT of torque. New, the car was about $28,000; the seller is asking $9,992 for this example in Red over Black with just 32,315 miles. Examples with more miles were listed between $7,000 and $7,500.

Yes, the car bears a resemblance to the Infiniti G37 line. Yes, Hyundai is not a “sexy” name in automobiles. Still, this is a car with a little kick that has a decent look for less than ten grand. Anyway, this is the first Hyundai on Frugal Friday!

This next car is far removed from the Hyundai segment of the market and just looking at its price without any context, this would not seem like a Frugal Friday pick. A picture is worth a thousand words, or so “they” say:

 

Used 2012 Aston Martin V8 Vantage S Roadster CHARLOTTE, NC 28212 - 534217116 - 1

 

Also from AutoTrader a picture of a 2012 Aston Martin V8 Vantage S Roadster in Tungsten Silver over Bitter Chocolate with fewer than 31,000 miles. This car was about $130,000 new. The seller is asking $51,900. OK, so maybe the car is more than the $40,000 average “transaction price” for a new vehicle in the US. OK, so maybe other luxury cars seem to have depreciated more than 60 percent since 2012. Still, this is a drop-dead gorgeous Aston Martin convertible for far less than a new Chevrolet Suburban. Oh, it’s an Aston with 430 HP.

As always I welcome thoughtful comments about this or any other post or topic. Have a great weekend!

 

#FrugalFriday

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Throwback Thursday

This day in 1969 was the last day that the Beatles’ two-sided hit “Come Together/Something” was Number One on the Billboard charts. It was their first two-sided number one single thanks to a change in Billboard policy. Beginning with the Hot 100 of November 29, 1969, Billboard changed its method of compiling the chart, ranking both titles of double-sided hits in the same position. Prior to that modification, Billboard ranked the A and B sides of the same single in different chart positions if both sides received meaningful airplay. (Otherwise, only one side—usually the A side—would be ranked if it earned enough airplay and sales.)

In all honesty, I am not a big Beatles fan although I like their music far more than the music of Elvis Presley. I don’t think I actually own any Beatles’ music nor would I likely stream any if I used such a service. I’m sure that makes me rare in my demographic. However, I fully appreciate the group’s significance and impact on music. From Billboard a picture of the Fab Four:

 

See the source image

 

Not that this has anything to do with anything, but I have a friend who bears an amazing and startling resemblance to John Lennon, especially Lennon without facial hair.

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On this day in 1941, the US aircraft carrier Lexington and five heavy cruisers left Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. As a result, these ships were not damaged during the Japanese attack two days later.

The Lexington played a meaningful role in the Pacific early in World War II, but was—unfortunately—damaged off the coast of New Guinea in combat in May, 1942 and was scuttled by an American destroyer in order to prevent its capture. The wreck of Lexington was located in March, 2018 by an expedition led by the late Paul Allen (Microsoft’s co-founder and owner of the Seattle Seahawks and Portland Trailblazers), who discovered the ship about 430 nautical miles off the northeastern coast of Australia in the Coral Sea.

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On this day in 1977, Chrysler Corporation began production of the Dodge Omni and Plymouth Horizon. Why is this event significant? These were the first front-wheel drive economy cars built in the US and the first FWD vehicles produced in meaningful quantities by Chrysler.

These cars were produced until early 1990 and about 2.5 million of them were made. The Omni/Horizon helped to keep Chrysler afloat. Since the Horizon sold more units than the Omni and since Plymouth is no longer with us, a picture from CarGurus of a 1982 Plymouth Horizon:

 

https://static.cargurus.com/images/site/2010/06/11/18/42/1982_plymouth_horizon-pic-1378707370948953864-1600x1200.jpeg

 

I am always aware that a given car has different meanings for different people. While a car like this is pas pour moi I appreciate what it meant for Chrysler and for the millions who purchased them. Different strokes for different folks…

 

#TheBeatles

#Lexington

#PlymouthHorizon

#somanycarsjustonelife

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Specific Output of Crazy

 

A funny, IMO, little sign my wonderful wife and I recently purchased. It’s a good thing it’s not a competition because I might win…don’t think so, take a look at this:

 

 

As if I didn’t have enough books on Studebaker and Packard and AMC…I have just begun reading the Critchlow book (it arrived yesterday), which focuses more on how company decisions were made and the effect of company history on those decisions than on the details of what cars Studebaker was making during specific time periods.

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This post from carbonhans.blog about Hennessey offering performance upgrades for the C8 Corvette led me to think about specific output for automobile engines. Specific output means power per unit of volume or unit of displacement. The article about Hennessey claims the company will offer tunes of the LT2 engine that will produce as much as 1,200 horsepower. That is 193.5 HP/liter or 3.2 HP/cubic inch. Of course, that is an aftermarket value and not from the factory.

American car companies fell all over themselves in the 1950s claiming that one of their engines was the first to produce at least one HP/cubic inch. For the record—sorry, Corvette fans—the first engine available from a US manufacturer that generated at least one HP/cubic inch was the optional engine for the Chrysler 300B, meaning model year 1956, that made 355 HP from 354 cubic inches. (That’s 61.2 HP/liter for the metrically minded.)

 

See the source image

 

From journal.classiccars.com a picture of a 1956 Chrysler 300B.

Today, with turbocharged (and supercharged) engines specific outputs are much higher than anyone could have dreamed in the 1950s. Ford’s newest generation GT has an engine, a 6-cylinder engine no less, that produces 647 HP from 3.5 liters or 184.9 HP/liter. (That’s about three HP per cubic inch.)

 

See the source image

 

From newcarreleasepreview.com a picture of the current generation Ford GT. The picture below from motorauthority.com is a car shown and discussed here before, a car with a 4-cylinder engine of fewer than 100 cubic inches displacement that produced 270 HP, the now-discontinued Peugeot RCZ R:

 

See the source image

 

In case you’re wondering, or even if you’re not, the RCZ R engine had a specific output of 168.8 HP/liter or 2.8 HP/cubic inch. Both the RCZ R and Ford GT engines are turbocharged. As I have written before I believe it wouldn’t be the worst thing if all internal-combustion engines were turbocharged. The engines could have smaller displacement, meaning better fuel economy, without giving up performance. These engines are also more thermally efficient than their naturally-aspirated brethren and have lower emissions.

 

#CrazyCompetition

#SpecificOutput

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